THE BLACK BRITISH CLERICAL WORKERS’ RESPONSE: Economic Conditions

Economic Conditions

Economic conditions are more of a transactional contract than a relational contract; they are negotiated but nevertheless still able to influence the employee’s decision as to whether to stay or leave the local authority. About 90% of the black British clerical workers viewed the current state of the UK economy as likely to bring to bear strong influence on families with higher childcare cost, big mortgage, and other family obligations. Almost 70% of the participants interviewed pointed out that the present economic recession makes the job market insecure and so makes it hard for them to change job in case they lose their job. Below Nana put it this way:

I have been working here for over twenty years and my job is secure for now, but with many restructuring taking place across UK local authorities, I just cannot risk changing my job. What if I change my job, a year later I was told there is no more work for me. At the age of 54 I would not be able to cope (Nana) Screening methods

Nana’s story confirms the trepidation that is common among the black British clerical workers interviewed. About 70% do not think this is the right time to consider leaving the organization until the UK Screening methods
economy improves.Another finding revealed that the present economic recession has made participants think twice before leaving their employer as they do not want to end up losing their job. About 90% of the participants indicated that because of the high cost of living in London, the implication is that they have to seek for the best employers in terms of remuneration to enable them to meet personal and family obligations. Below Ewah made the following narratives:

This economic recession has made me to be very selective in terms of where I seek employment. This is because I have to support my family members financially, this includes my husband and children, my retired parents, and my extended family like my cousins, nephews, brothers, sisters and uncles. I have to send money to them on a regular basis to assist in their education and well-being. I cannot afford to stay where I do not have the opportunity to earn good salary (Ewah)

Ewah’s story is typical of a characteristic (older person), as 90% of the participants believed they are responsible for the upbringing of their extended families and so feared the worse if things should go wrong. In support, Fola also made the following comment:

My problem is that the UK economy is bad and I do not know if I am going to have a job for the next 12 months. With restructuring coming up soon, nobody can tell what would happen. So for me the UK economic condition comes first as I decide whether to stay or leave the organization (Fola)

The uncertainty of the job market caused by the current economic recession is the single biggest reason why most participants resist leaving their present organization. Therefore 70% of the participants interviewed pointed out that the current economic recession is likely to have greater influence on families with higher childcare cost, higher mortgage, and the obligation to care for their family members.